Energy Systems Technology Evaluation Program

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The Energy System Technology Evaluation Program (ESTEP) is conducting real-world demonstrations.

Each ESTEP project requires participation by Department of Navy (DoN) civilians, military personnel or veterans in key technical or business project roles, thus providing real-world training and education opportunities for the future DoN energy workforce. These participants include students enrolled in technical and business energy-track curricula at the Naval Postgraduate School.

A pilot veterans outreach effort is underway in which student veterans at local universities, including California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), are provided internships for participation on ESTEP projects.

Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) and Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) play key roles in DoN energy: education (NPS); installation construction, operations and maintenance (NAVFAC); and energy network operations and security (SPAWAR). Therefore, these three organizations are leading execution of the program.

EDUCATION


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INSTALLATION, CONSTRUCTION, OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

NAVFAC Logo

ENERGY NETWORK OPERATIONS AND SECURITY

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Technology Advancement

The Energy System Technology Evaluation Program (ESTEP) is conducting real-world advanced technology demonstrations to evaluate emerging energy technologies using Navy and Marine Corps facilities as test beds.
Data collected and analyzed in this program will be used to evaluate performance, reliability and security of energy technologies under various environmental and operating conditions and to provide the baseline data required for inclusion into energy efficiency systems and equipment procurement specifications.

The technology focus will be on innovative pre-commercial and nascent commercial energy technologies obtained from open market sourcing, including companies from within the venture capital and small business communities.

Education and Training

During the course of implementing technology demonstrations at naval installations and in the private sector, often the greatest hurdles are not necessarily the technology challenges, but are instead fiscal constraints, policies, regulatory requirements and restrictions, permitting, and other institutional and bureaucrat hindrances that often delay and prevent projects implementation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the complex project process – financial, institutional, bureaucratic and technical – by project mangers will facilitate project implementation and will provide well-trained energy managers able to continually improve the processes in the future.

The knowledge sets described above can be taught at some level in a classroom; however, true understanding of project complexity can only be fully recognized and effectively handled through real-world experience.

Veteran and Wounded Warrior Programs

With regard to veteran opportunities, ONR and the current ESTEP naval partner organizations (SPAWAR, NAVFAC and NPS) are establishing linkages to veteran and wounded warrior programs and outreach efforts. A pilot veterans outreach effort is underway in which student veterans at local universities, including California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), are provided internships for participation on ESTEP projects.

Additionally, ONR is exploring ways to incorporate wounded warrior factors into the ONR-supported Renewable Energy Architectures for Cultural and Human Environments (REACHE) program led by a San Francisco based company, MKThink, such that future facility designs and architectures provide optimal working and living environments regardless of any disabilities. Such architectural approaches would eliminate design and technical factors that are actually the true disablers for human capabilities.

A quote from a Psychology Today article (“The Spaces We Create: What They Can Teach Us,” May 26, 2011 by Alison Bonds Shapiro) captures these thoughts:

“… a person is not inherently disabled, that he only experiences himself as disabled when he interacts with a world around him that contains barriers. It is the relationship to the physical environment that creates either the experience of empowerment or the experience of disability. When we shape our environments so that everyone can engage with them with a sense of accomplishment, we change not only access but literally change the way people know and think about themselves.”

Because energy efficiency and other energy technology are already major components for architectural design and building technologies, energy career choices by Wounded Warriors and those working with Wounded Warriors can bring unique personal knowledge to advance the development and implementation of empowering architectures for all.

Projects

The Energy System Technology Evaluation Program (ESTEP) is conducting real-world demonstrations.

Have a look at the technology advancement and education and training projects conducted by SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific (SCC Pacific), Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), and California State University San Marcos (CSU San Marcos).

The ESTEP projects offer a real-world training and education for civilians, military personnel and veterans wishing to enter an energy career path, including those enrolled in technical and business energy-track curricula at NPS

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